spiritual navigation & intuition development

Do you know half as many climate scientists as you do Kardashians? You will now.

Leading up to the 2017 March for Science, I was brainstorming on t-shirt ideas with my then boss. Once I pondered the gravity of the event I found myself ignoring his texts and researching climate change scientists, and I was soon inspired to design something that spotlights the men who have shaped our current understanding of climate science. Because like all the great comic book heroes these beings fight to save the world, and they should be pop culture icons, too, in the rank of greats like David Bowie.

I printed two dozen 11"x14" copies and distributed them, along with each scientist's bio, at the march. My boss pointed out that they're all dudes, and that he thought the future was female, like the famous shirt says. The future needn't be female, I said, just feminine - the side of both men and women that has been repressed by patriarchy. These men seem to have a closer relationship to the planet than many feminists I see out there, and Mother Earth is the greatest teacher of divine feminine there is. So  let's give credit where credit is due - to the patient heroes committed to the health of our home.

”The worst consequences of climate change will be experienced by the poorest 3 billion (people), largely living in villages, who had nothing to do with this. Not 100 years from now. Not 50 years from now. Ten to 15 years from now, they’re going to see major disasters.” - V.R. 2016   ‘During a postdoctoral position with NASA in 1975  Veerabhadran Ramanathan  discovered that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were another powerful driver of the greenhouse effect. For nearly 100 years, scientists believed carbon dioxide was the only human-produced greenhouse gas. He found that a CFC molecule could be 10,000 times more effective in absorbing infrared radiation than a carbon dioxide molecule, making CFCs potentially important despite their very low concentrations in the atmosphere. By 1985 Ramanathan and others showed that CFCs together with methane and other trace gases could have nearly as important a climate effect as increases in CO2. In other words, global warming would arrive twice as fast as had been expected.   In recent years Ramanathan has been courting religious leaders in an effort to reach audiences apathetic or dismissive of concerns linked to a warming planet. In 2014 he met with Pope Francis in the parking lot of the Vatican and used the opportunity to tell the pontiff that 3 billion of the world’s poorest people will suffer the worst consequences of climate change.  To read about the work Ramanathan is doing to bridge the gap between religion and science, click here . Sources:  Scripps Institution of Oceanography ;  San Diego Union-Tribune

”The worst consequences of climate change will be experienced by the poorest 3 billion (people), largely living in villages, who had nothing to do with this. Not 100 years from now. Not 50 years from now. Ten to 15 years from now, they’re going to see major disasters.” - V.R. 2016

‘During a postdoctoral position with NASA in 1975 Veerabhadran Ramanathan discovered that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were another powerful driver of the greenhouse effect. For nearly 100 years, scientists believed carbon dioxide was the only human-produced greenhouse gas. He found that a CFC molecule could be 10,000 times more effective in absorbing infrared radiation than a carbon dioxide molecule, making CFCs potentially important despite their very low concentrations in the atmosphere. By 1985 Ramanathan and others showed that CFCs together with methane and other trace gases could have nearly as important a climate effect as increases in CO2. In other words, global warming would arrive twice as fast as had been expected. 

In recent years Ramanathan has been courting religious leaders in an effort to reach audiences apathetic or dismissive of concerns linked to a warming planet. In 2014 he met with Pope Francis in the parking lot of the Vatican and used the opportunity to tell the pontiff that 3 billion of the world’s poorest people will suffer the worst consequences of climate change. To read about the work Ramanathan is doing to bridge the gap between religion and science, click here.
Sources: Scripps Institution of Oceanography; San Diego Union-Tribune

In 1975, Wally Broecker coined the phrase global warming when he published a paper titled: “Climate Change: Are we on the Brink of a Pronounced Global Warming?” 40 years later,  Funny or Die wrote this mock apology from Broecker  (and linked to his very real  bio ) in response to Senator James Inhofe’s surreal attempt to debunk the science of global warming with a snowball.  ‘His major research interest has been the ocean’s role in climate change. He was among the pioneers in radiocarbon and isotope dating – the quintessential processes for creating maps of the Earth’s past climate fluctuations since as early as the Pleistocene period. He was also the first person ever to recognize what he named the Ocean Conveyor Belt, arguably the most important discovery in the history of oceanography and its critical relation to climate. While Broecker is an advocate of utilizing alternative fuels, he is realistic about humanity’s addiction to fossil fuels, especially in industrializing nations, and he works toward manufacturing and developing carbon sequestering devices: safe, silo-like instruments designed to neutralize fossil fuel emissions.’ Source:  Earth Institute at Columbia University

In 1975, Wally Broecker coined the phrase global warming when he published a paper titled: “Climate Change: Are we on the Brink of a Pronounced Global Warming?” 40 years later, Funny or Die wrote this mock apology from Broecker (and linked to his very real bio) in response to Senator James Inhofe’s surreal attempt to debunk the science of global warming with a snowball.

‘His major research interest has been the ocean’s role in climate change. He was among the pioneers in radiocarbon and isotope dating – the quintessential processes for creating maps of the Earth’s past climate fluctuations since as early as the Pleistocene period. He was also the first person ever to recognize what he named the Ocean Conveyor Belt, arguably the most important discovery in the history of oceanography and its critical relation to climate. While Broecker is an advocate of utilizing alternative fuels, he is realistic about humanity’s addiction to fossil fuels, especially in industrializing nations, and he works toward manufacturing and developing carbon sequestering devices: safe, silo-like instruments designed to neutralize fossil fuel emissions.’
Source: Earth Institute at Columbia University

'In June 1988 he made one of the first assessments at a congressional testimony that human-caused warming had already measurably affected global climate. Shortly after, a World Conference gathered hundreds of scientists and others in Toronto. They concluded that the changes in the atmosphere due to human pollution "represent a major threat to international security and are already having harmful consequences over many parts of the globe," and declared that by 2005 the world should push its emissions some 20% below the 1988 level.' Source: Wikipedia

'In June 1988 he made one of the first assessments at a congressional testimony that human-caused warming had already measurably affected global climate. Shortly after, a World Conference gathered hundreds of scientists and others in Toronto. They concluded that the changes in the atmosphere due to human pollution "represent a major threat to international security and are already having harmful consequences over many parts of the globe," and declared that by 2005 the world should push its emissions some 20% below the 1988 level.' Source: Wikipedia

Guy Stewart Callendar was a British engineer who attempted to revive the greenhouse-effect theory of 19th Century scientist Svante Arrhenius. Callendar presented evidence that both temperature and the CO2 level in the atmosphere had been rising over the past half-century, and he argued that newer spectroscopic measurements showed that the gas was effective in absorbing infrared in the atmosphere.' Source: Wikipedia

Guy Stewart Callendar was a British engineer who attempted to revive the greenhouse-effect theory of 19th Century scientist Svante Arrhenius. Callendar presented evidence that both temperature and the CO2 level in the atmosphere had been rising over the past half-century, and he argued that newer spectroscopic measurements showed that the gas was effective in absorbing infrared in the atmosphere.' Source: Wikipedia

'Revelle is among the early scientists to study anthropogenic global warming. In 1957, Revelle co-authored a paper with Hans Suess that suggested that the Earth's oceans would absorb excess carbon dioxide generated by humanity at a much slower rate than previously predicted by geoscientists, thereby suggesting that human gas emissions might create a "greenhouse effect" that would cause global warming over time. Although other articles in the same journal discussed carbon dioxide levels, the Suess-Revelle paper was "the only one of the three to stress the growing quantity of CO2 contributed by our burning of fossil fuel, and to call attention to the fact that it might cause global warming over time."' Source: Wikipedia

'Revelle is among the early scientists to study anthropogenic global warming. In 1957, Revelle co-authored a paper with Hans Suess that suggested that the Earth's oceans would absorb excess carbon dioxide generated by humanity at a much slower rate than previously predicted by geoscientists, thereby suggesting that human gas emissions might create a "greenhouse effect" that would cause global warming over time. Although other articles in the same journal discussed carbon dioxide levels, the Suess-Revelle paper was "the only one of the three to stress the growing quantity of CO2 contributed by our burning of fossil fuel, and to call attention to the fact that it might cause global warming over time."' Source: Wikipedia

'An American scientist whose recording of carbon dioxide at the Mauna Loa Observatory first alerted the world to the possibility of anthropogenic contribution to the "greenhouse effect" and global warming. 1961 - The Keeling Curve measures the progressive buildup of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, in the atmosphere. The Keeling curve is an essential piece of evidence of the man-made increases in greenhouse gases that are believed to be the cause of global warming.' Source: Wikipedia  There’s a wonderful one man show called Dr. Keeling’s Curve played (and co-developed by) by M.A.S.H. actor Mike Farrell, that has aired on PBS. It may be possible to find the show online or playing live at a theater near you. Visit  DrKeelingsCurve.com  for more info.

'An American scientist whose recording of carbon dioxide at the Mauna Loa Observatory first alerted the world to the possibility of anthropogenic contribution to the "greenhouse effect" and global warming. 1961 - The Keeling Curve measures the progressive buildup of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, in the atmosphere. The Keeling curve is an essential piece of evidence of the man-made increases in greenhouse gases that are believed to be the cause of global warming.' Source: Wikipedia

There’s a wonderful one man show called Dr. Keeling’s Curve played (and co-developed by) by M.A.S.H. actor Mike Farrell, that has aired on PBS. It may be possible to find the show online or playing live at a theater near you. Visit DrKeelingsCurve.com for more info.

'Edward Norton Lorenz is the pioneer of chaos theory and the scientist who coined the term "butterfly effect". How can climate be predictable if weather is chaotic? The trick lies in the statistics. In those same models that demonstrate the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions, it turns out that the long term means and other moments are stable. This is equivalent to the  butterfly  pattern ( seen on this site ) being statistically independent of how you started the calculation. The lobes and their relative position don’t change if you run the model long enough. Climate change then is equivalent seeing how the structure changes, while not being too concerned about the specific trajectory you are on.’ Source: Wikipedia and realclimate.org

'Edward Norton Lorenz is the pioneer of chaos theory and the scientist who coined the term "butterfly effect". How can climate be predictable if weather is chaotic? The trick lies in the statistics. In those same models that demonstrate the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions, it turns out that the long term means and other moments are stable. This is equivalent to the butterfly pattern (seen on this site) being statistically independent of how you started the calculation. The lobes and their relative position don’t change if you run the model long enough. Climate change then is equivalent seeing how the structure changes, while not being too concerned about the specific trajectory you are on.’ Source: Wikipedia and realclimate.org

‘Syukuro Manabe is a meteorologist and climatologist who pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe worked with director Joseph Smagorinsky to develop three-dimensional models of the atmosphere. Manabe and Wetherald (1967) developed one-dimensional, single-column model of the atmosphere in radiative-convective equilibrium with positive feedback effect of water vapor. Using the model, they found that, in response to the change in atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide, temperature increases at the Earth's surface and in the troposphere, whereas it decreases in the stratosphere.’ Source: Wikipedia

‘Syukuro Manabe is a meteorologist and climatologist who pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe worked with director Joseph Smagorinsky to develop three-dimensional models of the atmosphere. Manabe and Wetherald (1967) developed one-dimensional, single-column model of the atmosphere in radiative-convective equilibrium with positive feedback effect of water vapor. Using the model, they found that, in response to the change in atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide, temperature increases at the Earth's surface and in the troposphere, whereas it decreases in the stratosphere.’ Source: Wikipedia

'In 1973, this British scientist speculated that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) could have a global warming effect. His Gaia hypothesis, which contends that the earth is a single, self-regulating organism, is now accepted as the founding principle of most climate science, and his invention of a device to detect CFCs helped identify the hole in the ozone layer.' Source: Wikipedia

'In 1973, this British scientist speculated that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) could have a global warming effect. His Gaia hypothesis, which contends that the earth is a single, self-regulating organism, is now accepted as the founding principle of most climate science, and his invention of a device to detect CFCs helped identify the hole in the ozone layer.' Source: Wikipedia

Disclaimer: I did not shoot these photos. Google gave them to me, and I turned them into vector graphics. For the good of the planet.